Physicians Briefing

  • Asthma Drug May Help Those With Chronic Hives
    Omalizumab (Xolair), used to treat moderate-to-severe allergic asthma, appears to offer relief to people with chronic hives who haven't been helped by standard medications, new research published online July 21 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology suggests.
  • Automated Models Can Identify Acute Back Pain in EMRs
    Administrative data models can discriminate acute low back pain from nonacute cases in electronic medical records, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of Spine.
  • Can Bike Riding Up Prostate Cancer Risk?
    A new study fuels the ongoing debate over the health risks of bicycle riding for men: Researchers found that cyclists who bike more may face a higher risk of prostate cancer, but not a greater chance of infertility or erectile dysfunction. The study appeared in the July 11 issue of the Journal of Men's Health.
  • Decrease in HIV Diagnosis Rate From 2002 to 2011
    From 2002 to 2011 there was a decrease in the annual HIV diagnosis rate, with decreases in almost all demographic populations, according to a study published in the July 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. This issue has been released early to coincide with AIDS 2014, the International AIDS Conference, held from July 20 to 25 in Melbourne, Australia.
  • Drug-Resistant Superbug on the Rise in Southeast U.S. Hospitals
    Community hospitals in the southeastern United States have seen a five-fold increase in the number of cases of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during the past five years, according to a new study published in the August issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.
  • Fetal Hemoglobin Glycation May Reflect Hyperglycemia in Utero
    Glycation of the α-chain in fetal hemoglobin is higher in neonates from women with gestational diabetes mellitus and may reflect hyperglycemia exposure in utero, according to a study published online July 10 in Diabetes Care.
  • Good Response for Sofosbuvir + Ribavirin in HIV/HCV Coinfection
    Patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C (genotype 1, 2, or 3) have high rates of sustained virologic response with the oral, interferon-free combination of sofosbuvir and ribavirin, according to a study published in the July 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. This issue has been released early to coincide with AIDS 2014, the International AIDS Conference, held from July 20 to 25 in Melbourne, Australia.
  • Lanreotide Improves Survival With Enteropancreatic Tumors
    Lanreotide significantly improves survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (grade 1 or 2), according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
  • National Survey Finds Most U.S. Physicians Are Satisfied
    Most U.S. physicians are satisfied, with satisfied physicians more likely to report positive trends in medicine, according to a report published by Jackson Healthcare.
  • Physician Continuity Is Key After ER Visit for Heart Failure
    Heart failure patients who follow up with a familiar physician after release from the emergency department have better outcomes, according to research published online July 9 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Heart Failure.
  • Pregnancy Loss Ups Future Risk of Cardiovascular Disease
    The risk of cardiovascular disease is increased among postmenopausal women with prior pregnancy loss, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.
  • Tesamorelin Cuts Visceral Fat in HIV Patients
    For HIV-infected patients with abdominal fat accumulation, the growth hormone-releasing hormone analog tesamorelin is associated with reductions in visceral fat and modest reductions in liver fat, according to a study published in the July 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. This issue has been released early to coincide with AIDS 2014, the International AIDS Conference, held from July 20 to 25 in Melbourne, Australia.

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